Yellow: Race In America Beyond Black And White

  • Title: Yellow: Race In America Beyond Black And White
  • Author: Frank H. Wu
  • ISBN: 9780465006397
  • Page: 440
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Yellow Race In America Beyond Black And White In the tradition of W E B Du Bois Cornel West and other public intellectuals who confronted the color line of the twentieth century journalist law professor and activist Frank H Wu offers a uniqu
    In the tradition of W E B Du Bois, Cornel West, and other public intellectuals who confronted the color line of the twentieth century, journalist, law professor, and activist Frank H Wu offers a unique perspective on how changing ideas of racial identity will affect race relations in the new century.Often provocative and always thoughtful, this book addresses some ofIn the tradition of W E B Du Bois, Cornel West, and other public intellectuals who confronted the color line of the twentieth century, journalist, law professor, and activist Frank H Wu offers a unique perspective on how changing ideas of racial identity will affect race relations in the new century.Often provocative and always thoughtful, this book addresses some of the most controversial contemporary issues discrimination, immigration, diversity, globalization, and the mixed race movement, introducing the example of Asian Americans to shed new light on the current debates Combining personal anecdotes, social science research, legal cases, history, and original journalistic reporting, Wu discusses damaging Asian American stereotypes such as the model minority and the perpetual foreigner By offering new ways of thinking about race in American society, Wu s work challenges us to make good on our great democratic experiment.

    • Yellow: Race In America Beyond Black And White ¦ Frank H. Wu
      440 Frank H. Wu
    • thumbnail Title: Yellow: Race In America Beyond Black And White ¦ Frank H. Wu
      Posted by:Frank H. Wu
      Published :2019-08-21T03:00:25+00:00

    About Frank H. Wu


    1. Frank H. Wu Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Yellow: Race In America Beyond Black And White book, this is one of the most wanted Frank H. Wu author readers around the world.


    599 Comments


    1. It's a little concerning how long it took me to read this book. Warning: This is not a book you can read with your mind on your dinner. Despite the fact that this book is not so easy to read, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Wu's description of anti-Asian sentiments in America is compelling and interesting, going pretty in-depth into the origins of these stereotypes, and then gently bashing them to pieces. I particularly enjoyed his sections on "The Perpetual Foreigner" and the model minority. Wu [...]

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    2. Finally, a book that breaks away from the racial dichotomy and explores what it means to Asian in America. Wu discusses both the old and new cultural stereotypes that Asian Americans face and how that kind of biased thinking disadvantages both Asian Americans and those who believe the stereotypes. Recognizing the rise of mixed marriages, Wu includes a chapter discussing how the concept of race is slowly becoming even less of a black and white issue and that any discussion must acknowledge and in [...]

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    3. Via Google search, sought-out Brian Lamb's Book TV interview with Frank Wu, as part of self-education prior to an adoption in 2005. Was instantly sold on this author. Frank Wu - a professor at Howard University in Washington - who was born in Michigan in the mid-sixties, and is approximately the same age as myself. However, his life experiences have been profoundly impacted by his Chinese ethnicity. This book opened my eyes and informed my voting decision in the 2008 U.S. presidential election.

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    4. See my original review post here: gamingforjustice/2016/09/I have read Yellow over the course of the past year. I did not read it consistently, but mainly used it to talk with students I work with and to provide them excerpts I thought might be useful in their own identity development. Last month, I decided to pick it back up, reread a couple of chapters, and finish the book. I do not think I can aptly provide a comprehensive review of Frank Wu’s Yellow without dedicating the next couple of we [...]

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    5. This is a thick book for a reason: it's very thorough, touching on hotbutton race issues that show up frequently in media as simplified issues of Black and white, and using Asian-American experiences as a tool for complexity and depth to both dismantle the racism that makes them hotbutton issues and to suggest anti-racist challenges to those issues. It's definitely written by a lawyer, which can make it a slow read, and that in some ways leaves me really torn: as it covers that broad range of ho [...]

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    6. Wu's book starts out amazingly -- he takes us through a journey of racism experienced by Asian Americans from forms of racism we, non-asians, are familiar with (e.g. stereotypes of Asians as intellectually gifted math nerds) to more invidious form of discrimination that are looked over or perhaps outdated but still relevant (e.g. societal belief that Asians and Asian Americans are more loyal to their native Asian countries than the US). I was absolutely riveted by the first three chapters of the [...]

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    7. I don't know why it took me five years to finally get around to reading this book. Wu touches on the model minority myth, the perpetual foreigner trope, affirmative action, immigration, intermarriage, coalition building and more. I especially liked how it wasn't only a call for non-APAs to think about race "beyond black and white"; it also challenged APAs to take more ownership and leadership in making that happen.

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    8. Frank H. Wu's Yellow is an excellent analysis of the absence of an Asian perspective in America's racial debate and what it's like to be an Asian-American as a result. Throughout the book, I found myself thinking "That's happened to me!" with an alarming frequency. Yellow also has the added benefit of explaining the dense analysis of a related subject in Edward W. Said's Orientalism in a way that is concise and easily understood.

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    9. Could not relate to it in places, still a well put together writing exercise and very passionate authorHaving had life experiences since reading the book, it might be a more appropriate now than when I read it.Best part Coming to a realization that there are issues being, in Kayne West's words, a single black female in the USA today

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    10. I've been reading a lot lately about the complicated issues of Asian American culture, but this defeated me. It's really interesting stuff, but a bit heavy. My brother has a copy, so I'll return to it someday. In the meantime, I'll stick with Adrian Tomine and Derek Kirk Kim, and Mariko Tamaki, et al.

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    11. A good introduction to Asian America. I will say however, that Frank H. Wu's background is in law, which definitely shows throughout the book (a particularly long list of stereotyped caricatures of Asians in media sticks out in my mind). A bit dense to read at times (from what I recall as an undermotivated undergrad), but recommended reading.

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    12. Dense but very interesting. Throwing all the countries Westerners consider Asian (close to 50) and lumping them into "Asian-American" doesn't allow for all the variances in language, beliefs, and cultures. Model minorities and other stereotypes associated with this population limits our understanding of the vastness of experiences Asian immigrants bring to the U.S.

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    13. Love Frank Wu, his writing is snappy, he indulges the reader with his personal experience and then goes on to discuss the world as it is

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    14. Written by the first Asian American law professor at Howard, this book finally brings Asians to the table. Bravo!

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    15. I appreciate this book tackling issues that have been touched on in discussions of race, but with more depth. Not only does Wu discuss Affirmative Action at length, but the Model Minority & Perpetual Foreigner dual myths, "diversity", and intermarriage and people of mixed race. As others have mentioned, the writing can be a bit dense at times, and I would get distracted by some of the tangents. Wu is also much more of an idealist than I am not exactly a problem, but makes some of the ending [...]

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    16. Wu provides a detailed discussion of the issues facing Asian-Americans. much of the historical discrimination was new to me and goes far beyond the Japanese internment camps off World War II. Wu tackles obvious issues, such as the downside of being the "model minority," but then goes on to discuss the complications of affirmative action, and the odd way that Asian-Americans are misunderstood by both White and Black Americans. Wu is a law professor at Howard University and his writing its detaile [...]

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    17. As an Asian-American who's lived in the American South for much of her life, it's very gratifying to hear thoughts about the dynamic Asian-Americans add to the reductionist Black-White binary that oftentimes surrounds racial relations. However, since this book was published in 2002, I'd encourage readers to supplement this reading with newer, additional texts regarding Asian-American identity politics because so much has shifted in America's racial environment within the past decade.

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    18. This is a very important book that is very badly written. Just painful.

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    19. Subtitled “race in America Beyond Black and White”, Wu, a lawyer and professor at Howard University, blends his own experience with discussions and arguments. He brings his perspectives to affirmative action, Asian Americans as the “model minority”, the “Dilemma of Diversity”, multiculturalism, “Intermarriage and the Mixed Race Movement”, and “The Power of Coalitions.” Whatever disagreements and problems I have with Wu’s ideas and arguments I set aside because of the enligh [...]

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    20. I got to page 190, when I decided life is too short to read a book that I just kinda hate.Here is the thing with this book: I'm not the right audience. This is a common problem in my life, I'm often "not the right audience" for a book. AKA a nice of way of saying I fucking hated it, but in good conscience can't quite say was a "bad" book. Many readers said they disliked this book because it was too "academic" or too "boring". It was neither of these things. I just hate the author and his belief [...]

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    21. May 2015 AAUW Adelante Book Recommendation by Janice McKenzie, C. Springs Branch: Writing in the tradition of W. E. B. Du Bois, Cornel West, and others who confronted the “color line” of the 20th century, journalist, scholar, and activist Frank H. Wu offers a unique perspective on how changing ideas of racial identity will affect race relations in the 21st century. Wu examines affirmative action, globalization, immigration, and other controversial contemporary issues through the lens of the [...]

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    22. I bought this book during my trip to NCORE and had Frank Wu sign my copyI was really hoping to gain more insight in to asian american culture and struggles, being labeled as the model minority and how that label lead many people to ignore the struggles, prejudices, and intolerence that asian american face even in today's society but instead I felt like Wu who I believe is a lawyer discussing a lot of court cases and media cases

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    23. This book discusses going beyond just black-white racial relations and focuses on the Asian American perspective. Wu incorporates his own personal anecdotes as he confronts common stereotypes of Asian Americans, pulls in Asian American history that most people are unfamiliar with, and the state of race relations in the US today. It's a very thought-provoking read.

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    24. Met Frank Wu and I think he-s cool. Plus he-s a Unitarian (or at least was exploring it at the time I met him when he came to speak at my college). Hope to read the book sooner than later, but the print is small, and I-ll admit, ashamedly that that doesn-t encourage, lol.

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    25. It has some interesting insight into being Asian in America. Not only Asian but it has an engaging style which I think many Asian Americans would find easy to relate to, and many anecdotes about growing up in America that make the author's analysis of race in America an interesting read.

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    26. Excellent analysis of the absence of the Asian American struggle in racial debate. Wu discusses the history of violence against Asian American and how that affects modern culture today in politics, media, and academia. Long book but worth the read.

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    27. Interesting book about Asian identity in contemporary America. Frank Wu does a good job debunking and explaining origins of many of the myths and stereotypes that exist about the Asian community.

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    28. Best book I had to read for this class

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    29. I read this but I was not entirely pleased with it. I did meet and talk to the author at a book signing. He is a great speaker and a professor at Howard University at the time of our meeting.

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    30. another intro to asian american issues book. a dime a dozen.

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