The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis Drake: 1577-1580

  • Title: The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis Drake: 1577-1580
  • Author: R. Samuel Bawlf
  • ISBN: 9780802714053
  • Page: 455
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis Drake On September Francis Drake sailed his ship the Golden Hinde into Plymouth Harbor on the southwest coast of England He had long been given up for lost and rumors quickly circulated about w
    On September 26, 1580, Francis Drake sailed his ship, the Golden Hinde, into Plymouth Harbor on the southwest coast of England He had long been given up for lost, and rumors quickly circulated about where he had been on his three year round the world voyage, and about the plunder he had brought home to fill Queen Elizabeth s treasury However, a veil of secrecy was immediOn September 26, 1580, Francis Drake sailed his ship, the Golden Hinde, into Plymouth Harbor on the southwest coast of England He had long been given up for lost, and rumors quickly circulated about where he had been on his three year round the world voyage, and about the plunder he had brought home to fill Queen Elizabeth s treasury However, a veil of secrecy was immediately imposed on the expedition Drake s journals and charts were impounded, and his men were forbidden, on pain of death, to divulge where they had been especially during the summer of 1579, when they had dropped from sight in the North Pacific.In hindsight, Drake s journey was arguably the greatest sea voyage of all time In a ship barely one hundred feet long, he sailed than 40,000 miles, much of the voyage at extraordinary speed disrupted the Spanish Empire in the New World encountered often hostile native peoples on four continents narrowly escaped disaster on numerous occasions and became the first captain to circumnavigate the globe.Samuel Bawlf masterfully recounts the drama of this extraordinary expedition within the context of England s struggle to withstand the aggression of Catholic Europe and Drake s ambition for English enterprise in the Pacific He offers fascinating insight into life at sea in the sixteenth century from the dangers of mutiny and the lack of knowledge about wind and current to the arduous physical challenges faced every day by Drake s men But it is Bawlf s assertion of Drake s whereabouts in the summer of 1579 that gives his book even greater originality From a seminal study of maps of the period, Bawlf shows with certainty that Drake sailed all the way to Alaska much farther than anyone has heretofore imagined thereby rewriting the history of exploration Drake was, Bawlf claims, in search of the western entrance to the fabled Northwest Passage, at which he planned to found England s first colony, which could wrest control of the Pacific, and the wealth of the East Indies, from Spain Drake s voyage was, in fact, far ahead of its time another 200 years would pass before the eighteenth century explorers of record reached the northwest coast of North America.A cast of luminous characters runs through The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis Drake Philip II of Spain, Europe s most powerful monarch Elizabeth s spymaster and powerful advisor, Francis Walsingham the encyclopedic cosmographer John Dee and Abraham Ortelius, the great Dutch mapmaker to whom Drake leaked his Pacific discoveries In the end, though, it is Francis Drake himself who comes most fully to life through the lens of his epic voyage Remembered most as a privateer and for his victory over the Spanish Armada, the Drake that emerges from these pages is so much a dynamic leader of men, a brilliant navigator and sailor, and surely one of history s most daring explorers.

    • The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis Drake: 1577-1580 By R. Samuel Bawlf
      455 R. Samuel Bawlf
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      Posted by:R. Samuel Bawlf
      Published :2019-08-23T02:59:51+00:00

    About R. Samuel Bawlf


    1. R. Samuel Bawlf Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis Drake: 1577-1580 book, this is one of the most wanted R. Samuel Bawlf author readers around the world.


    116 Comments


    1. I came to this book with scant knowledge of Sir Francis Drake, basically that he was post-Christopher Columbus British naval explorer – and that he had a beard. Obviously there is much more to this amazing man’s story and ample reason as to why he’s remembered – and books are still being written about him – 400+ years after his sea voyages. (To put Drake in historical perspective, William Shakespeare was a contemporary.) This volume provides an excellent and very readable chronicle of [...]

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    2. A fairly concise description of the “secret” voyage and life of Sir Francis Drake. One of the most fascinating issues is the deception that the surrounds this trip as well as other voyages by explorers in Drake’s time. Trade routes, and by extension, the maps that detailed them, were so critical that maps were intentionally altered by monarch’s to protect the information that these explorers developed. In the case of King Phillip of Spain, he published maps that portrayed the Pacific Oce [...]

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    3. Geographer and former politician Samuel Bawlf burst onto the literary scene with a captivating theory that Sir Francis Drake explored the Pacific Northwest of North America almost 200 years before other European explorers, claiming the territory for England as Nova Albion but failing in his primary mission to find a northwest passage between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. There is no definitive proof, of course, and without that school-children’s textbooks will remain unchanged, but what a r [...]

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    4. When I saw this book in my local library I thought, "Hmm. Pirate story. Nice." I had no idea I was about to read the tale of the second man to ever circumvent the globe; which he did in a little wooden Galleon named "The Golden Skiff."He fought the Spanish, partied and warred with natives, braved storms, heatwaves, freezing, and mutiny, to return to England with a boatload of treasures that catapulted him to International fame. The book itself is non-fiction and reads as a history book would, bu [...]

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    5. Samuel Bawlf’s, “The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis Drake” is a good book but is a little dry in parts. I was initially put off by the text-book style of writing when compared with the fluid and detailed prose of explorer novelist Laurence Bergreen. But once I got into it I realized that Bawlf provides many useful summaries regarding the use of navigational instruments (the astrolabe, cross-staff) and the broader events that contextualized Drake’s travels (the Treaty of Tordesillas 1494, t [...]

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    6. This is a good, interesting book. For my taste it could have been better were Bawlf a better story-teller. However, all the facts are here and there is a myriad of them, often laid out with extracts from original writings and logs of people involved. Drake was perhaps the penultimate English explorer (restless beyond imagining) and his skills as navigator, sailor, leader and even politician all come to the fore in this wide-ranging tale. I found the workings of governments and nations, especiall [...]

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    7. This is a fascinating and, to me, compelling argument about the extent of Drake’s northward exploration during the less documented portions of his voyage around the world. Bawlf combines a personal knowledge of the waters of the Northwest with what has been some obviously extensive scholarship. It’s handled very lightly in this popular version of the argument, but there are plenty of long quotations from sixteenth century sources, and Bawlf’s vision of sixteenth-century politics is in line [...]

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    8. This is a great swashbuckling book. We all learned of how Francis Drake circumnavigated the world looting spanish ships on the way and arriving back in Elizabethan England with a ship full of treasure. What is new is the discovery that part of his mission was suppressed and the full story only recently pieced together. Part of his mission was to sail around the southern tip of S. America, navigate the Strait of Magellan and then sail up the western coast as far north as to find the western outle [...]

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    9. Bawlf first tells the entrancing story of Francis Drake, a man with virtually no background who leaped into immense wealth and influence via his voyages into the Spanish maritime empire. According to Bawlf, the various fragments of information left by Drake after he English spy-masters had stolen and hidden almost everything reveal that he discovered British Columbia and the "north-west passage" route back to England. This discovery held enormous import for the British elite, who ached to disman [...]

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    10. This is a history of the voyages of Drake. After giving you the commonly known history of the man and explaining his times and the world situation to some degree his suppressed voyage details are discussed. His voyage around the world was not a secret. But the official story didn't match up the amount of time it took for the voyage. Here, the author discusses the logical explanation, Drake's time exploring the Puget Sound/Vancouver area and why his exploration of this area was suppressed. Detail [...]

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    11. "The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis Drake" S. Bewlf. 2003. Successful slaver, intrepid buccaneer, and famous explorer, Sir Francis Drake is with out question one of the most colorful and exciting characters in maritime history. The book's main focus is on Drake's secret exploration of the Pacific Northwest in search of the famed Northwest Passage. Artifacts from archeological digs and the oral history of Native Americans, along with scant surviving cartographic knowledge are used to piece together [...]

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    12. A well researched and interesting account of Sir Francis Drake, his voyage around the world and his possible exploration of our NW coast. I learned lots about the conflicts between Spain and England and Drake's plundering of various Spanish treasures. It is so amazing to see what these explorers did in the 1500's not knowing where they were going and having to live off their own resourcefulness. The end of the book is a bit speculative of Drake's voyage around Vancouver Island, partly because th [...]

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    13. Growing up in the SF Bay Area, I was told (taught?) that Sir Francis Drake "discovered" the bay and left a plaque. So I was suprised to read in this book that um, he didn't ever go to SF. Go figure! I mean, I was genuinely suprised when I got to the end of the book and figured that he wasn't heading towards SF. I guess that story was proven false about twenty years ago, but I never heard different. So that was cool. Otherwise, the book is capable, but hardly imparts the um, flavor of what a 16th [...]

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    14. Wow! My son lent me this book and said he thought I'd like it. Boy was he right. Drake is another one of those characters from history I've always been fascinated about. His voyage around the world and his defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588 were events that reshaped the history of the world over 400 years ago. (Incidentally, I've always been fascinated with round-the-world voyages for some reason and once read a book written by Francis Chichester which I think was called the Gypsy Moth about h [...]

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    15. Kaasahaarav kirjeldus ühest oma aja kuulsaimast maadeavastajast, seiklejast, piraadist. Raamat põhineb tõsielusündmustel, nii hästi-halvasti kui neid on tänapäeval võimalik rekonstrueerida, aga omab ka ilukirjanduslikku väärtust. Hea katkend ajastust, mil meie planeedil oli veel midagi tõepoolest avastada ning seikused ei olnud kaugeltki mitte turvalised; kui seadused kehtisid ainult nii kaugele kui neid oli võimalik viia ning sellest edasi oli oportunistlike, tihti tugevama õigust [...]

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    16. If you're looking for a definitive biography of Sir Francis Drake, this isn't it. But if you're already a big fan and looking for some more details on one of his most famous and, I must say, intriguing voyages, then this is the right book for you. I may be the only person to fit that bill, but I must say that it is really interesting and the research and speculation are all well grounded, which makes for a great read.

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    17. Intriguing story of the greatest journey by Sir Francis Drake, one that was hidden from history and not repeated for hundreds of years. The author (Bawlf) manages to tell a LOT of background information without it coming off completely dry. A great story, with drama and intrigue. This is the kind of non-fiction I like. Historical and documented, but where there is ambiguity, the author picks a direction and goes with it to focus on an entertaining story.

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    18. Annotated. Provides a good biographical sketch of Drake while focusing on the period of time during the 1580's-1590's, and particularly the Northwest pacific aspects of his round the world voyage in 1577-80. The book is written in a narrative style. It provides convincing support for its conclusions and arguments. The handling and use of small boats such as pinnances is given a great deal of credit in the physical undertaking of an expedition.

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    19. Impressive research and I do think Bawlf has uncovered something new. I'm not knowledgeable enough in the history of cartography to say whether all his claims regarding Drake's voyage are equally valid, but I think it is fair to say that Drake ventured farther north than has been previously acknowledged.

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    20. My sister and I read this book together. I found the writing was engaging and made the topic interesting. I love historical non fiction and this book is no exception. Bawlf explores the topic and intrigued me to look into the matter after I had finished the book. Unlike many books that explore this topic I found Bawlf's style engaging and his narrative had the ability to suck you in.

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    21. Too dense for enhanced readability.It occurs to me that by describing a "secret" voyage the author could just jot down anything because the records were ordered expunged by Queen Elizabeth. So now, we get to know all the details? Sounds like fiction.

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    22. The author does a great job of making the argument, and supporting it with evidence, that Sir Francis Drake had been secretly tasked by Queen Elizabeth to search for the Northwest Passage from the Pacific side. A well written, adventurous history.

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    23. I was awed by the journeys made in tiny wooden ships, with only primitive instruments and faith to guide the sailors - sailing across immense oceans, along hostile coasts - and moved by the possible stories of men and women stranded on remote shores, far from home

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    24. Fascinating account of Drake's global circumnavigation. The speculative nature of the final part does diminish the book in my mind, but I suppose that once the Privy Council got ahold of Drake's information, speculation was the best we could hope for.

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    25. Highly enjoyable read as long as one recognizes that this is speculative history (attempt to explain gaps in the historical record) rather than solid history. As speculation, it is mostly plausible, though the people left at Comox is a bit of a believability stretch.

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    26. This is a great book and I really loved learning about Drake. He is now one of the top people I would want to meet - given the opportunity. He is so much better than any "Captain Jack Sparrow" - absolute coolness.

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    27. Glad I read it. Didn't know that much about Drake before reading this book. Quite the man! His feats of conquest, swashbuckling, and exploration were amazing. Forget Johnny Depp. Someone should make a rip roaring moving about this guy!

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    28. The first 2/3rds of the book were engaging, but the last 1/3rd was a struggle to finish. Overall a good book.

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    29. Fascinating read.

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    30. An excellent book that makes you want to jump up and scream, "Drake is a bad ass!" The man was brilliant and the book was brilliantly written.

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